French Courses

Fall 2024

Beginner's French I
Subject associations
FRE 101

This class develops the basic structures and vocabulary for understanding, speaking, writing, and reading in French. Classroom activities foster communication and cultural competence through comprehension and grammar exercises, skits, conversation and the use of a variety of audio-visual materials.

Instructors
Vincent Chanethom
Beginner's French II
Subject associations
FRE 102

The main objective of this course is to enable you to achieve intermediate communication proficiency in French. All four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing will be actively practiced in realistic communicative situations, through a variety of activities designed to help you strengthen newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures. You will learn to talk about events and people, construct narratives in French and develop reading and writing skills that will be a foundation for literacy in the target language. There is a wide use of authentic material from France and the Francophone world throughout the course.

Instructors
Vincent Chanethom
Intensive Beginner's and Intermediate French
Subject associations
FRE 103

FRE 103 is an intensive beginning and intermediate language course designed for students who have already studied French (typically no more than 2-3 years). Covering in one semester the material presented in FRE 101 and FRE 102, this course prepares students to take FRE 107 the following semester. FRE 103 is designed to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French in a cultural context using authentic materials. Classroom activities include comprehension and grammar exercises, conversation, skits, and working with a variety of audio-visual and online materials.

Intermediate French
Subject associations
FRE 105

The main objective of this course is to develop your listening, speaking and writing skills, while allowing you to explore contemporary French-speaking societies. It offers a thorough review of French grammar and a wide range of communicative activities chosen to improve proficiency and give practice of newly acquired linguistic material. The course will build your confidence in French while giving you a foundation for the understanding of French-speaking cultures and exposing you to their rich literary and artistic productions. A wide range of authentic material will be offered, including films.

Instructors
Raphael J. Piguet
Intermediate/Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 107

The main objective of this course is to examine what it means to communicate in a foreign language while helping students strengthen their linguistic skills and gain transcultural and translingual competence. Students will reflect on differences in meaning through the study of diverse cultural modules, including politics, art, current events, migration, and French and Francophone literary texts and films.

Instructors
Sandie P. Blaise
Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 108

FRE 108 is an intermediate to advanced class that will take you on a journey through various periods of French/Francophone history and culture and offer an opportunity to reflect on important questions at the center of contemporary debates. Examples include: the role of the State, urbanism, pandemics and ecology, healthcare, education, race and identity. We have selected a wide variety of materials (films, videos, newspaper articles, literary texts, etc.), so you will develop your ability to communicate and write on a wide range of topics in French and gain understanding of French and francophone cultures and societies.

Instructors
Murielle M. Perrier
Studies in French Language and Style
Subject associations
FRE 207

Visions fantastiques: using this notion, this course explores and questions concepts that are at the core of our common human experience. Why is the fantastique such an enduring genre? What political, philosophical, or sociological messages does it convey? How do authors exploit perceived cracks in our reality? Through a survey of many kinds of fantastiques works, FRE 207 offers in-depth, small-group discussions and critical analyses of the themes they tackle (such as colonialism and identity, our relationship to time and to nature, science and progress, or madness and reason) along with reinforcement of advanced grammatical structures.

Instructors
Nicolas J. Estournel
Raphael J. Piguet
Speak up! An Introduction to Topics in the Francophone World (SA)
Subject associations
FRE 208

This course is a discussion-based seminar, taught entirely in French, integrating cultural and linguistic learning. We will explore the Francophone world, examining a wide range of topics and issues and interacting with guest speakers from the regions studied. The course will provide intensive language practice, with an emphasis on the acquisition of a rich lexical base for social, economic, political and cultural topics and consolidation of grammatical foundations. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include environmental, educational, health, social, cultural and political issues as well as aesthetic considerations.

Instructors
Carole Marithe Trévise
French Theater Workshop (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 211 / THR 211

FRE/THR 211 will offer students the opportunity to put their language skills in motion by exploring French theater and acting in French. The course will introduce students to acting techniques while allowing them to discover the richness of the French dramatic canon. Particular emphasis will be placed on improving students' speaking skills through pronunciation and diction exercises. At the end of the semester, the course will culminate in the presentation of the students' work.

Instructors
Florent Masse
France Today: Culture, Politics, and Society (CD or SA)
Subject associations
FRE 215

An intensive discussion-based seminar, designed to integrate linguistic and cultural learning. We will examine contemporary debates on important cultural, social and political issues, allowing you to gain enhanced cultural understanding and knowledge while honing your skills. Topics include the promises of the "Thirty Glorious Years", the social transformations of the sixties and seventies (family life, women's rights, etc.); as well as the challenges brought by the post-colonial period and globalization: immigration, social exclusion and inequalities, rise of the far-right nationalism, problems in the "banlieues" and debates on secularism.

Instructors
Christine M. Sagnier
Revisiting Paris (HA)
Subject associations
FRE 217 / ECS 327 / COM 258 / URB 258

The City of Light beckons. Beyond the myth, however, this course proposes to look at the real sides and "lives" of Paris. Focusing on the modern and contemporary period, we will study Paris as an urban space, an object of representation, and part of French cultural identity. To do so, we will use an interdisciplinary approach, through literature, history, sociology, art history, architecture, etc. And to deepen our understanding, we will actually travel to Paris. During Fall Break (Oct. 11-19), students will not only (re)visit the city, but also meet guest speakers and conduct personal projects they will have designed in Princeton.

Instructors
André Benhaïm
Literature and the Relational Self in Contemporary French Prose (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 243 / ECS 383

This course focuses on developments of the past thirty years in French and francophone literature (the francophone component including Martinique, Guadeloupe, Senegal, Canada, and Vietnam). It examines especially-in contexts informed by issues of class, gender, race, migration, and generation-multiple ways in which a self is constituted and evolves in relation to other selves, to groups, and to history. The texts to be read include both fiction and nonfiction of an autobiographical inflection. Emphasis will be placed not only on substantive relational questions but also on the formal literary resources of which these authors make use.

Instructors
Thomas A. Trezise
Classics of French and Francophone Cinema (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 250

This course will explore classic French and Francophone cinema from Meliès and Lumière to the Nouvelle Vague. Directors to include Vigo, Renoir, Godard, Truffaut, Rouch, Varda, and Djibril Diop Mambety. The course will investigate both the specific cinematic languages developed by these various directors, as well as the historical and political context in which these films developed.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
Wandering Utopias: Writing and Rewriting Reality (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 306

Through multidisciplinary, multimodal creative writing, and project-based assignments, FRE 306 will explore the intersections of travel narratives with utopian thoughts and their philosophical and aesthetic implications. Travelogues offer images of otherness, yet in utopian discourses otherness is suppressed in the name of equality. How are concepts such as diversity, equity and inclusion problematized in this context? FRE 306 will tackle this question by studying works across different genres and periods, exploring issues such as race, gender, migration and ecology while reinforcing their linguistic, creative and critical skills.

Instructors
Murielle M. Perrier
Raphael J. Piguet
Books into Film: The Art of Adaptation (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 317 / COM 358

Filmmaking was always inspired by different kinds of texts (scripts, plays, novels, comics...) while raising crucial questions: Why retell a story that is already well-known? What makes a good adaptation? How faithful should it be? When does it become appropriation? Engaging comparatively with the texts and their cinematic transformations, we will examine the limits and possibilities of adaptation as an art through a wide range of genres and topics (social class, humor, love, homosexuality, intercultural relations, racism, colonialism, art...) and cultures from different countries (Canada, France, Japan, Morocco, Senegal).

Instructors
Yassine Ait Ali
André Benhaïm
Language and Empire in Early Modern France (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 320

Throughout early modern Europe, and in France in particular, literary, and linguistic reinvention coincided with, and was perhaps inextricable from, the beginnings of European global imperialism and nationalism. This course serves as an introduction to the development, politics, and aesthetics of early modern French literary practices as they are contextualized in this global colonial history. By examining a number of early modern texts of a variety of genres-travel narratives, linguistic manifestoes, poetry, dialogues, and essays-this course will explore interconnections between the development of the French language and imperialism.

Instructors
Katie Chenoweth
Evan Ditter
Landmarks of French Culture: Aimé Césaire: Postcolonial Poetry, Theatre, Critique (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 330 / AFS 330

This course will study a selection of the writings of Aimé Césaire, a towering figure of the 20th century in poetry, theatre, and postcolonial critique and politics. Césaire's poetry is arguably the most accomplished oeuvre of any anticolonial poet of the century, and a pinnacle of modernist French poetry tout court. Similarly, Césaire's theatrical works are outstanding moments in the creation of a theatre of decolonization, while his celebrated critical pieces, such as the "Discours sur le colonialisme", articulate the ethical and political grounds for the struggle to end colonialism.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
Technophobia (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 380 / ECS 387

Each new technology generates its own set of apprehensions, expressed through opinion pieces, literature, film, art, and public debates. This course surveys fearful responses to technologies such as print, electricity, radio, telegraph, telephone, photography, robots and automatons, the automobile, chemical warfare, the atom bomb, cloning, drones, IVF and technologies of reproduction, GMOs, mechanization, surveillance technologies, cell phones, the Minitel and Internet, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, etc. What patterns can be found in these fears? How have writers and artists channeled these in their work?

Instructors
Christy N. Wampole
Junior Seminar: French and Francophone Studies Now (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 398

This course dives into the richness of French-language literature and culture from different genres and time periods. The focus will be on textual analysis and translation, with additional forays in "reading" other cultural material such as film. In addition to close and far reading, students will receive practical training in translation, archival research, and digital humanities. We will also explore a variety of theoretical frameworks students may apply to their own research projects, such as semiotics, media studies, postcolonial studies and environmental humanities.

Instructors
Flora Champy
Seminar. 19th-Century European Art: Inventing Impressionism (LA)
Subject associations
ART 450 / FRE 408

How and why was Impressionism invented in Paris in the early 1870s, and why does it still matter today? This year marks the 150th anniversary of the first Impressionist exhibition, celebrated by a new exhibition, Paris 1874: Inventing Impressionism at the Musée d' Orsay and the National Gallery of Art. A trip to see this show in Washington will ground our investigation into the social conditions, geographies, and ideologies that informed this radical new way of painting. Readings will include primary sources alongside brand new and classic scholarship on the Impressionist avant-garde.

Instructors
Bridget Alsdorf

Spring 2024

Beginner's French I
Subject associations
FRE 101

This class develops the basic structures and vocabulary for understanding, speaking, writing, and reading in French. Classroom activities foster communication and cultural competence through comprehension and grammar exercises, skits, conversation and the use of a variety of audio-visual materials.

Instructors
Vincent Chanethom
Beginner's French II
Subject associations
FRE 102

The main objective of this course is to enable you to achieve intermediate communication proficiency in French. All four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing will be actively practiced in realistic communicative situations, through a variety of activities designed to help you strengthen newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures. You will learn to talk about events and people, construct narratives in French and develop reading and writing skills that will be a foundation for literacy in the target language. There is a wide use of authentic material from France and the Francophone world throughout the course.

Instructors
Vincent Chanethom
Nicolas J. Estournel
Susan L. Kenney
Intensive Intermediate and Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 1027

FRE 102-7 is an intensive double course designed to help students develop an active command of the language. Focus will be on reading and listening comprehension, oral proficiency, grammatical accuracy, and the development of reading and writing skills. A solid grammatical basis and awareness of the idiomatic usage of the language will be emphasized. Students will be introduced to various Francophone cultures through readings, videos and films.

Instructors
Johnny Laforêt
Intensive Beginner's and Intermediate French
Subject associations
FRE 103

FRE 103 is an intensive beginning and intermediate language course designed for students who have already studied French (typically no more than 2-3 years). Covering in one semester the material presented in FRE 101 and FRE 102, this course prepares students to take FRE 107 the following semester. FRE 103 is designed to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French in a cultural context using authentic materials. Classroom activities include comprehension and grammar exercises, conversation, skits, and working with a variety of audio-visual and online materials.

Instructors
Johnny Laforêt
Intermediate/Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 107

The main objective of this course is to examine what it means to communicate in a foreign language while helping students strengthen their linguistic skills and gain transcultural and translingual competence. Students will reflect on differences in meaning through the study of diverse cultural modules, including stereotypes; slang; advertisements; Impressionist art; Occupied France; current events; and French and Francophone literary texts and films.

Instructors
Sandie P. Blaise
Susan L. Kenney
Carole Marithe Trévise
Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 108

FRE 108 is an intermediate advanced course. It will take you on a journey through various periods of French history and culture and offer an opportunity to reflect on important questions at the center of contemporary debates. Examples include: the role of the State in the shaping of the nation, the organic revolution, the role of education in our society, etc... We have selected a wide variety of materials (films, videos, music, newspaper articles and literary texts) and carefully incorporated them into the curriculum so you will develop the ability to communicate and gain understanding of French and francophone cultures and societies.

Instructors
Raphael J. Piguet
Studies in French Language and Style
Subject associations
FRE 207

An interdisciplinary course proposing the study of language, culture, and French and Francophone literatures organized around the theme "Visions fantastiques". Includes the study of different genres and mediums on topics including fairy tales and folk tales; utopias and dystopias; science fiction; and folly, dreams and the surreal. The course offers a review and reinforcement of advanced grammatical structures and aims to improve written and oral expression through the study of texts and films.

Speak up! An Introduction to Topics in the Francophone World (SA)
Subject associations
FRE 208

This course is a discussion-based seminar, taught entirely in French, integrating cultural and linguistic learning. We will explore the Francophone world, examining a wide range of topics and issues and interacting with guest speakers from the regions studied. The course will provide intensive language practice, with an emphasis on the acquisition of a rich lexical base for social, economic, political and cultural topics and consolidation of grammatical foundations. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include environmental, educational, health, social, cultural and political issues as well as aesthetic considerations.

Instructors
Carole Marithe Trévise
The Making of Modern France: French Literature, Culture, and Society from 1789 to the Present (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 222

This course examines the major historical and cultural developments that have shaped France since the Revolution. By studying a series of classic texts, important films, paintings, and essays, we will undertake an interdisciplinary tour through two centuries of French cultural history, addressing issues such as nationhood, colonialism, democracy, and consumer society. The focus will be on the relations between artistic renovation, social change, and historical events.

Instructors
Murielle M. Perrier
Multiculturalism in French Cinema (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 227 / ECS 324

This course offers an introduction to film studies as well as a space for discussing the issues of race, multiculturalism and otherness in the French context. Students will learn to watch films critically, honing their linguistic and rhetorical skills through workshops and brief assignments. While we will survey prominent works, directors, actors, genres, and aesthetic movements in French cinema, the course will also strive to decenter the "canon" by showcasing thought-provoking and esthetically groundbreaking movies made in the last two decades by filmmakers themselves of very diverse backgrounds.

Instructors
André Benhaïm
Literature and Medicine: Illness, Writing, and Repair (EM)
Subject associations
FRE 240 / ECS 356

How have French writers sought to portray the experience of illness, medicine, and the modern hospital in recent years? What role, if any, does literature adopt, as its own form of knowledge and healing, in trying to care for sick bodies and diagnose the failings of the medical system itself? How might literature and medicine enrich each other? Short works by key modern writers on topics ranging from mental health, autism, and eating disorders to organ transplants, AIDS, abortion, and disability. Brief background readings in the medical humanities. Class is writing-intensive and discussion-centered to improve French language skills.

Instructors
Göran Magnus Blix
Writing the Self (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 260

This course investigates self-centered forms like autobiography, autofiction, the confession, the memoir, the diary, and forms that many writers have used to explore the self, including lyric poetry, correspondence, bande-dessinée, essay, travel narrative, fragment, interview, etc. Through canonical and lesser-known works written in French from the 18th century to today, we will seek to answer the questions: How does one preserve one's own personhood, memories, identity, and experiences in writing? Which techniques have writers used to do so? How has self-writing changed over time?

Instructors
Christy N. Wampole
Advanced French Language and Style
Subject associations
FRE 307

To improve spoken and written French through attentive study of French grammatical and syntactic structures and rhetorical styles, with a variety of creative, analytical and practical writing exercises, and reading of literary and non-literary texts.

Instructors
Murielle M. Perrier
Language, Power and Identity (CD or SA)
Subject associations
FRE 319

This course is an intensive discussion-based seminar which offers an introduction to sociolinguistics, or the study of language as a social phenomenon. Through readings, films, and documentaries, we will explore contemporary debates related to language, culture, politics, identity, and ideology in the Francophone world. The course includes a series of guest speakers for the discussion of Francophone case studies. Past speakers were from Morocco, Québec, Louisiana, Republic of Benin, La Réunion, and the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie.

Instructors
Christine M. Sagnier
French Culture against Fascism, 1930-1945 (HA or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 354 / ECS 345

As fascism was rising in Europe in the 1930s, French writers, artists, and intellectuals expressed their opposition to this threat both in action, coalescing around militant groups with overt political positions, and in their work. This antifascist cultural mobilization was sustained throughout the decade and siphoned into different kinds of resistance action and creation during WWII. This highly interdisciplinary course explores works of literature, art, cinema, and photography that fought fascism with words and images before and during the war in France. Works will be situated within their historical context and framed by theory.

Instructors
Efthymia Rentzou
Surrealism at One Hundred (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 358 / ECS 358 / ART 358 / COM 365

This course explores the basic ideas, works, and principles of Surrealism as it developed in France and around the world from the early 1920s into the present. A very wide array of material will cover diverse literary genres and media to show how the Surrealists wanted to revolutionize both art and life in its political and ethical dimensions, as well as the movement's ongoing impact. The course is highly interactive, built around two digital creative and critical projects, which will constitute the students' assignments throughout the semester.

Instructors
Efthymia Rentzou
Haiti: History, Literature, and Arts of the First Black Republic (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 376 / AAS 378 / LAS 379

The readings and discussions will consider how the literature and arts of Haiti affirm, contest, and bear witness to historical narratives concerning the world's first black republic. The course will sample an array of historical accounts, novels, Afro-Caribbean religion (Vodun), plays, music, film, and visual arts of this unique postcolonial nation.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
Photography: The History, Theory, and Literature of the Captured Image (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 382

This interdisciplinary course explores the rich history of photography in France, beginning with the work of early inventors (Niépce's heliographie, Daguerre's daguerréotype, Lumière's vues photographiques animées) and practitioners (Atget, Nadar). We will read important theories and literary texts in which photography plays a central role and will study portraits, landscapes, ethnographic, journalistic, medical, experimental, and documentary photographs, and other genres by French and Francophone photographers from the 19th century to today.

Instructors
Christy N. Wampole
Democratizing Culture (SA)
Subject associations
FRE 392 / THR 397

Democratizing Culture will look at the initiatives by French cultural institutions to democratize culture and make their offerings more accessible to everyone. In recent years, major French cultural institutions have tried to engineer ways to attract a more socio-economically diverse audience to their halls, galleries, and venues. Encouraged by the Ministry of Culture, new projects have emerged in the world of theater, music, the opera, and museums. During spring break, we will travel to France to have a first-hand experience and assessment of these cultural policies and meet with government officials and arts institutions' directors.

Instructors
Florent Masse
Topics in French Literature and Culture: Fantastic Fictions, 1650-1750 (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 401

This course examines a series of classic French works from a variety of genres (theater, poetry, novels and tales) in which human protagonists encounter the supernatural: gods and monsters, magic objects and speaking animals, mysterious travels and transformations. The authors often adapted ancient stories but also created new and enduring myths, employing outlandish fictions not only to entertain but also to raise moral, social, and philosophical questions. Classes will focus on attentive reading and discussion of the texts while taking into account their historical context, as well as visual interpretations such as illustrations and movies.

Instructors
Volker Schröder
'Modern' Poetry and Poetics: Baudelaire to the 'Present' (LA)
Subject associations
COM 422 / FRE 422 / GER 422

Designed for both undergraduates and graduate students, this course will focus on reading major "modern" poets and writings on poetics, in French, German, English and Spanish, with additional readings in theory of modernity, poetry, and the arts written by several of the poets we read. These include: Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Rilke, Celan, Garcia Lorca, Borges, Bishop and Ashbery. Secondary readings will include essays by major theorists and critics who consider the larger questions of representation, temporality, visuality, and language underlying poetic practice.

Instructors
Claudia Joan Brodsky
Princeton Atelier: Performing Marivaux (LA)
Subject associations
ATL 498 / FRE 498 / THR 498

The Atelier "Performing Marivaux" will offer students the rare chance to work with celebrated French director and playwright Guillaume Vincent, known in France for revisiting the classics. The course will be co-taught by Guillaume Vincent and Florent Masse, the Director of L'Avant-Scène, the French Theater Workshop. The course will culminate in a presentation of works on April 25, 2024.

Instructors
Florent Masse
Perception, Inhabitation, & Transformation
Subject associations
FRE 90

No description available

History, Lit & Arts of the 1st Black Republic
Subject associations
FRE 91

No description available

Fall 2023

Beginner's French I
Subject associations
FRE 101

This class develops the basic structures and vocabulary for understanding, speaking, writing, and reading in French. Classroom activities foster communication and cultural competence through comprehension and grammar exercises, skits, conversation and the use of a variety of audio-visual materials.

Instructors
Vincent Chanethom
Nicolas J. Estournel
Intensive Beginner's and Intermediate French
Subject associations
FRE 103

FRE 103 is an intensive beginning and intermediate language course designed for students who have already studied French (typically no more than 2-3 years). Covering in one semester the material presented in FRE 101 and FRE 102, this course prepares students to take FRE 107 the following semester. FRE 103 is designed to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French in a cultural context using authentic materials. Classroom activities include comprehension and grammar exercises, conversation, skits, and working with a variety of audio-visual and online materials.

Instructors
Susan L. Kenney
Johnny Laforêt
Intermediate French
Subject associations
FRE 105

The main objective of this course is to develop your listening, speaking and writing skills, while allowing you to explore contemporary French-speaking societies. It offers a thorough review of French grammar and a wide range of communicative activities chosen to improve proficiency and give practice of newly acquired linguistic material. The course will build your confidence in French while giving you a foundation for the understanding of French-speaking cultures and exposing you to their rich literary and artistic productions. A wide range of authentic material will be offered, including films.

Instructors
Raphael J. Piguet
Intermediate/Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 107

The main objective of this course is to examine what it means to communicate in a foreign language while helping students strengthen their linguistic skills and gain transcultural and translingual competence. Students will reflect on differences in meaning through the study of diverse cultural modules, including politics, art, current events, migration, and French and Francophone literary texts and films.

Instructors
Sandie P. Blaise
Susan L. Kenney
Carole Marithe Trévise
Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 108

FRE 108 is an intermediate to advanced class that will take you on a journey through various periods of French/Francophone history and culture and offer an opportunity to reflect on important questions at the center of contemporary debates. Examples include: the role of the State, urbanism, pandemics and ecology, healthcare, education, race and identity. We have selected a wide variety of materials (films, videos, newspaper articles, literary texts, etc.), so you will develop your ability to communicate and write on a wide range of topics in French and gain understanding of French and francophone cultures and societies.

Instructors
Murielle M. Perrier
Studies in French Language and Style
Subject associations
FRE 207

Visions fantastiques: using this notion, this course explores and questions concepts that are at the core of our common human experience. Why is the fantastique such an enduring genre? What political, philosophical, or sociological messages does it convey? How do authors exploit perceived cracks in our reality? Through a survey of many kinds of fantastiques works, FRE 207 offers in-depth, small-group discussions and critical analyses of the themes they tackle (such as colonialism and identity, our relationship to time and to nature, science and progress, or madness and reason) along with reinforcement of advanced grammatical structures.

Instructors
Nicolas J. Estournel
Raphael J. Piguet
Speak up! An Introduction to Topics in the Francophone World (SA)
Subject associations
FRE 208

This course is a discussion-based seminar, taught entirely in French, integrating cultural and linguistic learning. We will explore the Francophone world, examining a wide range of topics and issues and interacting with guest speakers from the regions studied. The course will provide intensive language practice, with an emphasis on the acquisition of a rich lexical base for social, economic, political and cultural topics and consolidation of grammatical foundations. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include environmental, educational, health, social, cultural and political issues as well as aesthetic considerations.

Instructors
Carole Marithe Trévise
French Theater Workshop (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 211 / THR 211

FRE/THR 211 will offer students the opportunity to put their language skills in motion by exploring French theater and acting in French. The course will introduce students to acting techniques while allowing them to discover the richness of the French dramatic canon. Particular emphasis will be placed on improving students' speaking skills through pronunciation and diction exercises. At the end of the semester, the course will culminate in the presentation of the students' work.

Instructors
Florent Masse
France Today: Culture, Politics, and Society (CD or SA)
Subject associations
FRE 215

An intensive discussion-based seminar, designed to integrate linguistic and cultural learning. We will examine contemporary debates on important cultural, social and political issues, allowing you to gain enhanced cultural understanding and knowledge while honing your skills. Topics include the promises of the "Thirty Glorious Years", the social transformations of the sixties and seventies (family life, women's rights, etc.); as well as the challenges brought by the post-colonial period and globalization: immigration, social exclusion and inequalities, rise of the far-right nationalism, problems in the "banlieues" and debates on secularism.

Instructors
Christine M. Sagnier
Revisiting Paris (HA)
Subject associations
FRE 217 / ECS 327 / COM 258 / URB 258

Beyond the myth of the City of Light, this course proposes to look at the real "lives" of Paris. Focusing on the modern and contemporary period, we will study Paris as an urban space, an object of representation, and part of French cultural identity. To do so, we will use an interdisciplinary approach, through literature, history, sociology, art history, architecture, etc. And to deepen our understanding of its history and its making, we will take a mandatory trip to Paris. During Fall Break (Oct. 13-21), students will not only (re)visit the city, but also meet guest speakers and conduct personal projects they will have designed in Princeton.

Instructors
André Benhaïm
The Rise of France: French Literature, Culture, and Society from the Beginnings to 1789 (HA)
Subject associations
FRE 221

Civil war, the rise of a centralized government, colonization, overwhelming public debt and attempts at women's liberation: this class covers the tumultuous history that led to the French Revolution while providing advanced language training. We study period documents as well as literary and artistic material. Topics include: courtly love, Jeanne d'Arc, Versailles, Marie-Antoinette, the Enlightenment, the Revolution and Terror.

Instructors
Flora Champy
Introduction to Literature (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 224

This course introduces students to works of literature in French from a range of historical periods and provides them with methods for literary interpretation through close reading. The course syllabus is organized around common themes and genres. This course is invaluable preparation for more advanced and specialized 300-level literature and culture courses. Classroom discussion and free exchange encouraged.

Instructors
Efthymia Rentzou
Migration, Diversity, Diaspora: Francophone Community-Engagement (CD)
Subject associations
FRE 372

This course explores displacements, identities, and representations of francophone populations around the globe. We will address key issues, challenges, and opportunities linked to resettlement, such as the relationship between language and identity, transnationalism, multilingualism, and language maintenance of French-speaking communities, particularly those living in the US and the New Jersey area. Students will also collaborate with a community partner; the French Heritage Language Program - an afterschool education program that helps young francophone immigrants recently arrived in the USA - and critically reflect on their experiences.

Instructors
Sandie P. Blaise
The Art of the Essay (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 385 / CWR 385

In this course, which is both a creative writing course and a literature course, students will study canonical French-language essays and newer forms of essayistic production (the essay film, photo essay, blog, and podcast) and will use these texts as models for their own writing. Beginning in the Renaissance with Montaigne's famous Essais and continuing to the present day with essays written throughout France and the Francophone world, students will analyze the stylistic and formal features of this compelling genre and seek to understand how the essay has maintained its relevance throughout the centuries.

Instructors
Christy N. Wampole
Race in French Theater (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 390 / THR 390

Race in French Theater will investigate the question of race and diversity on the French stages. We will study efforts made in recent years to diversify representations both on stage and in the audience, and examine the concrete steps taken by major institutions, subsidized national theaters, festivals, drama schools, and commercial theaters. We will compare similar current undertakings in the world of dance and at the Paris Opera, and broaden the scope of our inquiries by looking at representation and inclusion in French cinema. Theater artists will join us from France and share their experience creating in and for the present times.

Instructors
Florent Masse
Junior Seminar: French and Francophone Studies Now (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 398

This interdisciplinary course explores the state of French and Francophone Studies today and offers students a variety of methodologies and theoretical frameworks they may apply to their own research projects. Students will receive practical training in digital humanities, archival research, close and far reading, and will study the ways critical race theory, environmental humanities, semiotics, media studies, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality studies, poetics, and postcolonial studies have impacted the academic study of French-language literature and culture.

Instructors
Katie Chenoweth
Prose Translation (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 407 / TRA 407

A practical investigation of the issues affecting translation between English and French. Weekly exercises will offer experience of literary, technical, journalistic and other registers of language. Discussion will focus on the linguistic, cultural and intellectual lessons of translation seen as a practical discipline in its own right.

Instructors
David M. Bellos
Modern French Ecological Writing and Thought (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 420 / ECS 420 / ENV 420

How have French writers, thinkers, and activists addressed the growing environmental crisis in recent decades? In what ways does their work converge? We look here at how fiction and thought-often inspired by the work of activists-have confronted this challenge. Themes include climate change; agribusiness and factory farming; development and (de)growth; nuclear risk; environmental justice and health; species extinction; the attention economy; and ecofeminist and decolonial thought. Novels, essays, and BDs paired with landmark works by thinkers such as Gorz, Guattari, Serres, Latour, Descola, Zask, Morizot, Pelluchon, and Ferdinand.

Instructors
Göran Magnus Blix

Spring 2023

Beginner's French II
Subject associations
FRE 102

The main objective of this course is to enable you to achieve intermediate communication proficiency in French. All four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing will be actively practiced in realistic communicative situations, through a variety of activities designed to help you strengthen newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures. You will learn to talk about events and people, construct narratives in French and develop reading and writing skills that will be a foundation for literacy in the target language. There is a wide use of authentic material from France and the Francophone world throughout the course.

Instructors
Vincent Chanethom
Nicolas J. Estournel
Susan L. Kenney
Intensive Intermediate and Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 1027

FRE 102-7 is an intensive double course designed to help students develop an active command of the language. Focus will be on reading and listening comprehension, oral proficiency, grammatical accuracy, and the development of reading and writing skills. A solid grammatical basis and awareness of the idiomatic usage of the language will be emphasized. Students will be introduced to various Francophone cultures through readings, videos and films.

Instructors
Johnny Laforêt
Intensive Beginner's and Intermediate French
Subject associations
FRE 103

FRE 103 is an intensive beginning and intermediate language course designed for students who have already studied French (typically no more than 2-3 years). Covering in one semester the material presented in FRE 101 and FRE 102, this course prepares students to take FRE 107 the following semester. FRE 103 is designed to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French in a cultural context using authentic materials. Classroom activities include comprehension and grammar exercises, conversation, skits, and working with a variety of audio-visual and online materials.

Instructors
Johnny Laforêt
Intermediate/Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 107

The main objective of this course is to examine what it means to communicate in a foreign language while helping students strengthen their linguistic skills and gain transcultural and translingual competence. Students will reflect on differences in meaning through the study of diverse cultural modules, including stereotypes; slang; advertisements; Impressionist art; Occupied France; current events; and French and Francophone literary texts and films.

Instructors
Sandie P. Blaise
Carole Marithe Trévise
Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 108

FRE 108 is an intermediate advanced course. It will take you on a journey through various periods of French history and culture and offer an opportunity to reflect on important questions at the center of contemporary debates. Examples include: the role of the State in the shaping of the nation, the organic revolution, the role of education in our society, etc... We have selected a wide variety of materials (films, videos, music, newspaper articles and literary texts) and carefully incorporated them into the curriculum so you will develop the ability to communicate and gain understanding of French and francophone cultures and societies.

Instructors
Raphael J. Piguet
Studies in French Language and Style
Subject associations
FRE 207

An interdisciplinary course proposing the study of language, culture, and French and Francophone literatures organized around the theme "Visions fantastiques". Includes the study of different genres and mediums on topics including fairy tales and folk tales; utopias and dystopias; science fiction; and folly, dreams and the surreal. The course offers a review and reinforcement of advanced grammatical structures and aims to improve written and oral expression through the study of texts and films.

Instructors
Nicolas J. Estournel
Susan L. Kenney
Speak up! An Introduction to Topics in the Francophone World (SA)
Subject associations
FRE 208

This course is a discussion-based seminar, taught entirely in French, integrating cultural and linguistic learning. We will explore the Francophone world, examining a wide range of topics and issues and interacting with guest speakers from the regions studied. The course will provide intensive language practice, with an emphasis on the acquisition of a rich lexical base for social, economic, political and cultural topics and consolidation of grammatical foundations. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include environmental, educational, health, social, cultural and political issues as well as aesthetic considerations.

Instructors
Carole Marithe Trévise
The Making of Modern France: French Literature, Culture, and Society from 1789 to the Present (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 222

This course examines the major historical and cultural developments that have shaped France since the Revolution. By studying a series of classic texts, important films, paintings, and essays, we will undertake an interdisciplinary tour through two centuries of French cultural history, addressing issues such as nationhood, colonialism, democracy, and consumer society. The focus will be on the relations between artistic renovation, social change, and historical events.

Instructors
Murielle M. Perrier
French Literature: Approaches to the Language of Literary Texts (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 224

This course is meant to introduce students to classic works of French literature from a range of periods and genres, and to provide them with methods for literary interpretation through close reading of these texts. This course is organized around common themes and generic categories. It is invaluable preparation for more advanced and specialized 300-level courses. Classroom discussion and free exchange encouraged.

Instructors
Flora Champy
Contemporary French Theater (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 228 / THR 227

Contemporary French Theater will introduce students to the vibrant and diverse scene of contemporary theater in France. Every week we will read a new play by a celebrated or an emerging living playwright, and examine their shared topics of interest and writing styles. A great emphasis will be put on honing the students' speaking and writing skills through staged readings of excerpts of plays in class, and creative play-writing exercises. Some playwrights will join us virtually from France, as well as actors and directors specializing in the contemporary repertoire so as to share their experience creating it in the present times.

Instructors
Florent Masse
Advanced French Language and Style
Subject associations
FRE 307

To improve spoken and written French through attentive study of French grammatical and syntactic structures and rhetorical styles, with a variety of creative, analytical and practical writing exercises, and reading of literary and non-literary texts.

Instructors
Murielle M. Perrier
Advanced French Theater Workshop (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 311 / THR 312

In Advanced French Theater Workshop, students will focus their work on three main French playwrights: one classical, one modern, and one contemporary. This year, students will rehearse and perform excerpts from the great works of Marivaux, Alfred de Musset, and Bernard-Marie Koltès. The course will place emphasis on refining and improving students' acting and speaking skills. It will culminate in the public presentation of the students' "Travaux" at the end of the semester.

Instructors
Florent Masse
Language, Power and Identity (CD or SA)
Subject associations
FRE 319

This course is an intensive discussion-based seminar which offers an introduction to sociolinguistics, or the study of language as a social phenomenon. Through readings, films, and documentaries, we will explore contemporary debates related to language, culture, politics, identity, and ideology in the Francophone world. The course includes a series of guest speakers for the discussion of Francophone case studies. Past speakers were from Morocco, Québec, Louisiana, Republic of Benin, La Réunion, and the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie.

Instructors
Christine M. Sagnier
Versailles and the World (HA or LA)
Subject associations
ECS 326 / FRE 326

An interdisciplinary exploration of the meanings and uses of the palace and gardens of Versailles, from their creation as center of absolute monarchy under Louis XIV to their present status as an iconic site of French and European cultural heritage. The course aims in particular to study Versailles as a microcosm embodying a certain view of the world, and to highlight the roles that foreigners (artists, queens, diplomats, tourists) have played throughout its history. Readings will consist of a mix of primary sources and critical essays and will be complemented by various visual materials, ranging from original prints to websites and films.

Instructors
Volker Schröder
The Literature of Environmental Disaster (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 338 / ENV 338 / COM 367

The Anthropocene names both the advent of human mastery over nature and the serial catastrophes that now challenge our "risk society", from climate change and global plagues to nuclear fallout, flooding, the sixth extinction, and environmental racism. Literary testimonies can help us rethink the human relationship to the environment by shedding a unique light on how distinct cultures live this rapport. By studying novels, films, plays, and essays from France, Russia, Nigeria, India, Japan, and the US, we will see how some of the world's most exposed populations have navigated the lethal cross-currents of modernity.

Instructors
Göran Magnus Blix
The World in Bandes Dessinees (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 339 / AFS 339

This course explores representations of the World and History in major bandes dessinées (or graphic novels) published in French from the 1930s to the present, and produced by authors of various backgrounds (French, Belgian, Italian, Jewish, Iranian). Informed by theoretical readings, discussions will address key aesthetical, political, and ethical issues, including Exoticism, Orientalism, (Post)colonialism, national and individual identity, as well as the theory of reception, to critically assess the fluctuations of these visions between fantasy and testimony.

Instructors
André Benhaïm
The Original Antifa: French Culture against Fascism, 1930-1945 (HA or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 354 / ECS 345

As fascism was rising in Europe in the 1930s, French writers, artists, and intellectuals expressed their opposition to this threat both in action, coalescing around militant groups with overt political positions, and in their work. This antifascist cultural mobilization was sustained throughout the decade and siphoned into different kinds of resistance action and creation during WWII. This highly interdisciplinary course explores works of literature, art, cinema, and photography that fought fascism with words and images before and during the war in France. Works will be situated within their historical context and framed by theory.

Instructors
Efthymia Rentzou
Migration, Diversity, Diaspora: Francophone Community-Engagement (CD)
Subject associations
FRE 372

This course explores displacements, identities, and representations of francophone populations around the globe. We will address key issues, challenges, and opportunities linked to resettlement, such as the relationship between language and identity, transnationalism, multilingualism, and language maintenance of French-speaking communities, particularly those living in the US and the New Jersey area. Students will also collaborate with a community partner; the French Heritage Language Program - an afterschool education program that helps young francophone immigrants recently arrived in the USA - and critically reflect on their experiences.

Instructors
Sandie P. Blaise
Poetry and War: Translating the Untranslatable (LA)
Subject associations
HUM 423 / COM 465 / TRA 423 / FRE 423

Focusing on René Char's wartime "notebook" of prose poetry from the French Resistance, Feuillets d'Hypnos (Leaves of Hypnos), this course joins a study of the Resistance to a poet's literary creation and its ongoing "afterlife" in translations around the globe. History, archival research (traditional and digital), the practice of literary translation, and a trip to France that follows in Char's footsteps as poet and Resistance leader will all be part of our exploration. We will conclude with a dramatic performance of the "notebook" in multiple languages, as created by seminar participants.

Instructors
Sandra L. Bermann
The Writer, the Prince and the Public: Political Writing in the Eighteenth-Century (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 480 / ECS 481 / HIS 482

Who wrote about politics in the eighteenth century? Why? And for whom? This course will examine the genres and techniques Enlightenment writers invented to talk about politics in spite of official and unofficial censorship. Coined by Montesquieu, the phrase "political writer" can apply to a wide range of writers whose motivations, purposes, and publishing strategies varied in response to different urges and new audiences. The course is based on the study of primary texts, but also historical documents, such as indictments of writers.

Instructors
Flora Champy

Fall 2022

Beginner's French I
Subject associations
FRE 101

This class develops the basic structures and vocabulary for understanding, speaking, writing, and reading in French. Classroom activities foster communication and cultural competence through comprehension and grammar exercises, skits, conversation and the use of a variety of audio-visual materials.

Instructors
Vincent Chanethom
Nicolas J. Estournel
Susan L. Kenney
Intensive Beginner's and Intermediate French
Subject associations
FRE 103

FRE 103 is an intensive beginning and intermediate language course designed for students who have already studied French (typically no more than 2-3 years). Covering in one semester the material presented in FRE 101 and FRE 102, this course prepares students to take FRE 107 the following semester. FRE 103 is designed to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French in a cultural context using authentic materials. Classroom activities include comprehension and grammar exercises, conversation, skits, and working with a variety of audio-visual and online materials.

Instructors
Susan L. Kenney
Johnny Laforêt
Intermediate French
Subject associations
FRE 105

The main objective of this course is to develop your listening, speaking and writing skills, while allowing you to explore contemporary French-speaking societies. It offers a thorough review of French grammar and a wide range of communicative activities chosen to improve proficiency and give practice of newly acquired linguistic material. The course will build your confidence in French while giving you a foundation for the understanding of French-speaking cultures and exposing you to their rich literary and artistic productions. A wide range of authentic material will be offered, including films.

Instructors
Raphael J. Piguet
Intermediate/Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 107

The main objective of this course is to examine what it means to communicate in a foreign language while helping students strengthen their linguistic skills and gain transcultural and translingual competence. Students will reflect on differences in meaning through the study of diverse cultural modules, including stereotypes; slang; advertisements; Impressionist art; Occupied France; current events; and French and Francophone literary texts and films.

Instructors
Sandie P. Blaise
Nicolas J. Estournel
Carole Marithe Trévise
Advanced French
Subject associations
FRE 108

FRE 108 is an intermediate to advanced class that will take you on a journey through various periods of French/Francophone history and culture and offer an opportunity to reflect on important questions at the center of contemporary debates. Examples include: the role of the State, urbanism, pandemics and ecology, healthcare, education, race and identity. We have selected a wide variety of materials (films, videos, newspaper articles, literary texts, etc.), so you will develop your ability to communicate and write on a wide range of topics in French and gain understanding of French and francophone cultures and societies.

Instructors
Murielle M. Perrier
Raphael J. Piguet
Studies in French Language and Style
Subject associations
FRE 207

Visions fantastiques: using this notion, this course explores and questions concepts that are at the core of our common human experience. Why is the fantastique such an enduring genre? What political, philosophical, or sociological messages does it convey? How do authors exploit perceived cracks in our reality? Through a survey of many kinds of fantastiques works, FRE 207 offers in-depth, small-group discussions and critical analyses of the themes they tackle (such as colonialism and identity, our relationship to time and to nature, science and progress, or madness and reason) along with reinforcement of advanced grammatical structures.

Speak up! An Introduction to Topics in the Francophone World (SA)
Subject associations
FRE 208

This course is a discussion-based seminar, taught entirely in French, integrating cultural and linguistic learning. We will explore the Francophone world, examining a wide range of topics and issues and interacting with guest speakers from the regions studied. The course will provide intensive language practice, with an emphasis on the acquisition of a rich lexical base for social, economic, political and cultural topics and consolidation of grammatical foundations. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include environmental, educational, health, social, cultural and political issues as well as aesthetic considerations.

Instructors
Carole Marithe Trévise
French Theater Workshop (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 211 / THR 211

FRE/THR 211 will offer students the opportunity to put their language skills in motion by exploring French theater and acting in French. The course will introduce students to acting techniques while allowing them to discover the richness of the French dramatic canon. Particular emphasis will be placed on improving students' speaking skills through pronunciation and diction exercises. At the end of the semester, the course will culminate in the presentation of the students' work.

Instructors
Florent Masse
French Literature: Approaches to the Language of Literary Texts (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 224

This course is meant to introduce students to great works of French literature from a range of historical periods and to provide them with methods for literary interpretation through close reading of these texts. The course syllabus is organized around common themes and generic categories. This course is invaluable preparation for more advanced and specialized 300-level literature courses. Classroom discussion and free exchange encouraged.

Instructors
Efthymia Rentzou
Politics and Environment in France (SA)
Subject associations
FRE 230 / ENV 232

Improve your spoken and written French while studying some urgent topics in French environmental politics, from climate change and energy politics to environmental racism, food safety, animal rights, and degrowth. How is the French case unique? What is a ZAD and "un grand projet inutile"? What happened at Plogoff and Larzac? How do class, race, and gender intersect with the exploitation of nature? What exactly is "ecofascism" anyway? Discussion and creative projects will focus on films, bandes dessinées, literature, art, and essays; the course is writing- and speaking-intensive.

Instructors
Göran Magnus Blix
Classics of French and Francophone Cinema (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 250

This course will explore classic French and Francophone cinema from Meliès and Lumière to the Nouvelle Vague. Directors to include Vigo, Renoir, Godard, Truffaut, Rouch, Varda, and Djibril Diop Mambety. The course will investigate both the specific cinematic languages developed by these various directors, as well as the historical and political context in which these films developed.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
The 'Hidden Causes' of History: Integrating the Social and the Economic (HA or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 328 / COM 463 / HUM 301 / ECS 335

Our aim is to examine how the "social" and the "economic" become intertwined. From Enlightenment narratives about the origins of civilization, whether philosophical, ethnographic, or fictional, by Swift, Rousseau, or Graffigny, we also consider history-writing by Voltaire and Gibbon. We read early economic and sociological thought by Malthus, Saint-Simon, Balzac, and Smith, and delve into the crystallization of broadly Marxist approaches to society and culture in Engels, Benjamin, and, of course, Marx. While the category of "literature" will be an important lens for our thinking, archival and historical approaches will also be stressed.

Instructors
Celia L. Abele
Democracy and Education (HA)
Subject associations
FRE 348 / ECS 363 / HUM 358

What's the point of education? What should anyone truly learn, why, and how? Who gets to attend school? Is it a right, a privilege, a duty, an investment, or a form of discipline? Do schools level the playing field or entrench inequalities? Should they fashion workers, citizens, or individuals? Moving from France to the US, and from the Enlightenment to the present, we look at the vexed but crucial relationship between education and democracy in novels, films, essays, and philosophy, examining both the emancipatory and repressive potential of modern schooling. Topics include: Brown, class, meritocracy, testing, and alternative pedagogies.

Instructors
Göran Magnus Blix
Sex, Gender, and Desire in Francophone Africa (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 355 / AFS 355 / GSS 304

This course examines the complex role of gender and sexuality in Francophone Africa's literature and visual cultures. Framed primarily by postcolonial criticism, we will explore how Francophone African writers, filmmakers, and artists treat historical and contemporary issues connected to women and marginal sexualities' experiences, and how they appropriate vernacular/conventional modes of writing and filmmaking in their works. By reading critical writings alongside the novels and films, we will explore questions such as: How stories shape our understanding of gender roles? From whose perspective are they told? What do they exclude/repress?

Instructors
André Benhaïm
Topics in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature and Culture: Albert Camus (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 367 / ECS 367

Albert Camus was one of the most acclaimed writers of the 20th century, and one of the most paradoxical. Reading his major narratives, plays, and essays, we will assess how the author found himself often at odds with his own thought and creativity, through his philosophy, politics, or the very act of writing. We will see how Camus, always in between, eternally on the move, can help us face (and revolt against) the nonsense of our world, from pandemics to terrorism, imperialism and totalitarianism, how we can question ourselves and relate to others, while still remembering to seek happiness and beauty.

Instructors
André Benhaïm
Race in French Theater (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 390 / THR 390

Race in French Theater will investigate the question of race and diversity on the French stages. We will study efforts made in recent years to diversify representations both on stage and in the audience, and examine the concrete steps taken by major institutions, subsidized national theaters, festivals, drama schools, and commercial theaters. We will compare similar current undertakings in the world of dance and at the Paris Opera, and broaden the scope of our inquiries by looking at representation and inclusion in French cinema. Theater artists will join us from France and share their experience creating in and for the present times.

Instructors
Florent Masse
Topics in French Literature and Culture: Deconstruction (HA)
Subject associations
FRE 401

This course explores the history and legacy of deconstruction, the massively influential and notoriously difficult philosophical approach developed by Franco-Algerian philosopher Jacques Derrida. We trace the emergence of deconstruction in France in the 1960s, its adoption in America, and its evolution into a global phenomenon. While investigating the philosophical stakes of deconstruction, we will also reflect on its political, ethical, and institutional status, as well as the complex place of Algeria and the post-colonial. The class will make regular visits to Derrida's personal library in Firestone.

Instructors
Katie Chenoweth
Prose Translation (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 407 / TRA 407

A practical investigation of the issues affecting translation between English and French. Weekly exercises will offer experience of literary, technical, journalistic and other registers of language. Discussion will focus on the linguistic, cultural and intellectual lessons of translation seen as a practical discipline in its own right.

Instructors
David M. Bellos