Anna Cellinese

Senior Lecturer
Director, Italian Language Program
Phone: 
609-258-4496
Email Address: 
cellinese@princeton.edu
Office Location: 
319 East Pyne

OFFICE HOURS:
On Leave

Profile

Anna Cellinese joined the department of French and Italian in 2016. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Italian from Stanford University where she also taught and coordinated the Italian language program. She has published articles on Fenoglio and Pavese as well as on popular culture and language pedagogy. Her research addresses Italian contemporary culture, second language acquisition, and curriculum development.

Anna founded the Summer Immersion program in Pisa, Italy, in collaboration with the distinguished Scuola Normale Superiore. The program offers a full immersion experience and allows students to interact with the territory on a linguistic, cultural, and social level. The program is also a journey into four crucial topics that define Italian literature and culture:  Landscapes, Beauty, Migration, and Travel. These four pillars are analyzed through a transnational lens that gives particular emphasis to the concepts of alterity, diversity, language and identity, art and social redemption, multiculturalism, race and afro-Italian issues. Students acquire a better and deeper understanding of Italian literary and cultural trajectory throughout the centuries vis à vis a global outlook of societies.

In light of the transitional nature of the 21st century and its fast technological pace, Anna has designed and initiated, in collaboration with the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, a project to create an Italian digital platform that will provide a dynamic and flexible approach to language acquisition suited to the well-versed minds of Princeton students.

Research Interests

Her research delves into different aspects of pedagogy and second language acquisition: from transformative learning theory to social justice in the language classroom, from writing development in higher education to language acquisition through special learning dis/ability. Through her research, she brings out the idea that, within the multilingual and cross-cultural nature of the 21st century, second language acquisition offers a window to the world: an opportunity to rediscover our own cultural identity and critically embrace the “other.”

Current Projects

She is currently working on a textbook project that explores 21st- century authors whose voices and work variedly embody, interpret or antagonize dominant narratives in Italian contemporary society. From linguistic to corporeal, from gendered to political, from literary and musical to ethnic languages, this project forms a chorus of different voices that illuminate the plural and ever-changing character of society.